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Smart Snacking

Tips to boost nutrition between meals

Smart Snacking

Yogurt Your Way

A few suggestions to put a spin on a favourite snack

Yogurt Your Way

Snacks with Whole Grain & Fibre

10 easy snacks with Whole Grain and Fibre

Snacks with Whole Grain & Fibre

Snacks with 10g or more of Protein

11 simple snacks with 10 grams or more of protein per serving

Snacks with 10g or more of Protein

Snacks Under 200 Calories

10 delicious snack ideas under 200 calories

Snacks Under 200 Calories

Snacking Around the World

The most popular wholesome snacks from around the globe

Snacking Around the World

Eat Fit

Nudge your habits to manage your weight

Eat Fit

Yogurt and Kids' Weight

Study showed kids who ate yogurt had better nutrient intake and healthier body weight

Yogurt & Kids' Weight


Research

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Yogurt, Weight Management and Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes

Recent epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that yogurt is involved in the control of body weight and energy homeostasis and may play a role in reducing the risk for type 2 diabetes. This review discusses the specific properties that make yogurt a unique food among the dairy products.

Consumption of dairy foods and diabetes incidence

The role of dairy foods in the prevention of diabetes has received considerable attention in recent observational and intervention studies. This meta-analysis included data from 22 cohort studies comprised of 579,832 individuals. Findings suggest a possible role for dairy foods, particularly yogurt, in the prevention of T2D.

Snacking associated with overall diet quality among adults

US Adult snackers tend to have more nutrient-dense diets with positive associations to fruit, whole grains, and milk, and inverse associations with energy from solid fat, alcohol, and added sugars.

US Adolescent snacking and weight associations

Snackers, compared with nonsnackers, were less likely to be overweight or obese and less likely to have abdominal obesity.

“Keep your friends close, and your snacks closer.”

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